Glutathione, the fountain of youth

No one can live without glutathione

Your body certainly needs vitamin C.

And as long as you eat a healthy diet full of flavonoids and other polyphenols, it will thank you greatly.

But make no mistake, this is only part of the antioxidant work that is done by your body itself.

In fact, a large part of the cleaning of your cells is done by glutathione molecules, an antioxidant produced… by your liver.

Unfortunately, the production of glutathione decreases greatly with age, which is directly related to aging.

In fact, several age-related diseases, such as cataracts, Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease and arteriosclerosis, have been shown to be linked to low glutathione levels[1].

Without glutathione, the body becomes clogged up and soon succumbs.

Because the liver, which is the body’s most important filter, has a high need for glutathione.

And a molecule such as paracetamol, which is extremely common, dissolves it.

In addition, glutathione is essential to protect the body from heavy metals and other particularly harmful toxins, because it transforms them into elements that can be easily removed.

Finally, it plays a synergistic role with vitamins C, E and beta-carotene, antioxidants that are essential to the proper functioning of your body.

Although it is difficult to produce, it is nonetheless the antioxidant par excellence.

Indeed, glutathione is valuable because it is the most powerful antioxidant, and therefore the best anti-aging agent for your body – since your body itself is the supplier.

May your anti-aging cure be a success!

Yes, … there is a way to naturally repair your body on a cellular level… through activating your body to do what it is supposed to. This is not supplementation, it’s activation! 

We don’t claim to cure, treat, or mitigate disease. 

The Little Yellow Pill reduces oxidative stress by an average of 40% in 30 days and increases glutathione by approximately 300% in 120 days.

High oxidative stress and low glutathione are linked to hundreds of issues.

[1] https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/7730904/

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