Q10: The Oil That Makes Your Inner Engine Run | Longevity & Mitochondria | Health Talk

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Q10: The Oil That Makes Your Inner Engine Run | Longevity & Mitochondria | Health Talk
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Mitochondria are the organelles in our cells responsible for producing the cell’s energy currency. They contain their own DNA and have their own small set of proteins.

Watch the full episode of Q10: The Oil That Makes Your Inner Engine Run | Longevity & Mitochondria

Q10: The Oil That Makes Your Inner Engine Run | Longevity & Mitochondria | Health Talk


Mitochondria are responsible for producing 80% of the energy required by your body to live. Though they are essential and play an important role, they also cause a lot of harm. 70% of people suffer from chronic diseases aged over 50. This is the result of damage done to mitochondria. Every 7-10 years the mitochondria in your body start losing efficiency and this continues over time.

Which oil makes your inner engine run?

Q10 is an important nutrient in our bodies and helps animals and plants convert food into energy. Our bodies need the energy to function properly. We get energy from the food or supplements we eat, and from the oxygen, we breathe. The energy has to be used in every cell in our body. Q10 is a nutrient that helps us use the energy we get from food for our body to function normally. It also gives us energy if we get less oxygen.

Why is Q10 so important in energy production?

Q10 is a vital energy molecule that we all need to survive. It has important functions in the function of our immune system and organs. It plays a critical role in our heart and in the production of hormones. People who have a diet rich in Q10 have a much lower risk of all types of cardiovascular diseases, and they are less prone to the development of emphysema and many other degenerative diseases. In addition, Q10 plays an important role in brain health, and it improves the energy of our cells. Without Q10, we would not be able to live for more than a few weeks.

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